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themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islamic republic of iran". the first of these means, and these two get at the heart of our book. the united states is today enhanced and for the past two years a power and relative decline in the middle east. the second core team as the biggest beneficiary of american ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propositions, i want to ask you to compare the relative position of the united states and the islamic republic of a rant in middle east today with where they were on the eve of 9/11 over 10 years ago. on the eve of 9/11, every single government in the middle east with either pro-american government egypt and turkey in negotiation effectively to become pro-american but government. in libya are anti-iranian like saddam hussein's government in iraq. every single government in the middle east is either pro-americans in negotiations to become pro-american or anti-iranian. it pretty good position for the 90s dates in the middle
is in fact what happens. this was a chronology and when the united states government announced a large-scale resettlement of iraqis in 2007, we immediately looked at what we should be doing in light of this particular population which was different, in nationality we had not been resettling a great deal. we looked at enhancements which could bring on board that would address this new population and that's when we created the partnership with d.o. de. later >> was this in 2007? >> will yes, later when we identified a new partnership with the counter-terrorism center, that was initially focused on iraqi applicants but we learned by doing and we learned about the heightened level of checks and then we expanded to applicants of all nationalities. we use the iraqi program to raise the bar across the board for other nationalities. >> there were some 25,000 per year for a few years, isn't that right? >> i believe the high point was 18,000 ballots did you have the resources to do some kind of fairly thorough assessment of each of those 18,000 before they were able to be granted -- >> yes, sir,
'm going to start with two provocative themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islam you can republic of iran." the first of these themes, and these two really get at the heart of our book. the first of these themes is that the united states is today and has been for the past few years a power in relative decline in the middle east. and the second core theme is that the biggest beneficiary of america's ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propositions, i want to ask you to compare the relative positions of the united states and the islamic republic of iran in the middle east today with where they were on the eve of 9/11, just over ten years ago. on the eve of 9/11, every single government in the middle east was either pro-american, like the governments in egypt and turkey, in negotiations effectively to become pro-american, like the governments in syria and libya, or anti-iranian like the taliban government in afghanistan and saddam hussein's government in iraq. ev
on the united states by mexico so i thought at the time as a youngster only i had not moral courage enough to resign." grant, of course, in the war was a young lieutenant, and i found this is really moving quote, and that's why it's the title. the fact of the matter is grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. one thing that i talked about in the book and i'll talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public in the course of the u.s.-mexico war, not a long war by any means from being really enthuse yays tix and in favor of invading mexico to largely turning in the war, and i see the u.s. mexico war as the moment of america's first anti-war movement actually coming into being so there was anti-war sentiments during the revolution and certainly in the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happening in 1847 is a consensus, really, across the board. people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field, officers, politicians, all deciding that a war that was being more or less successfully waged in another c
in as an officer of the united states navy. i will introduce you to the whole family. my daughter, who is a social worker. and my daughter in law on the left. my number three granddaughter, 9 number two granddaughter, nine no. 4 granddaughter -- my number two granddaughters, my no. 4 granddaughter, my oldest granddaughter who is a freshman in college now, naomi. and my third son. i told my daughter when she married, if you change your mind, i'm keeping him. [laughter] i'm very proud of them although i would be happy to claim as my this is a family affair. kids, grandkids, moms, dads. you all get it. you get what it is so important today. we still have 68,000 troops in harm's way in some of the most godforsaken territory in the world. one of the things that you all know -- they are not looking for anything. but knowing that you remember. that we back home remember, we know what is going on. this is an important piece of the equation. another important piece as they started the organization, their families, -- [indiscernible] fighting these two wars. thank god we ended one in iraq and we are ending
tunes. fareed zakaria "gps" is next. >>> this is "gps global public square." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you today from london. happy new year. on today's show, we'll look ahead at what 2013 might bring around the world. i have a great panel richard haass, anne-marie slaughter and ian bremer who i will ask to gaze into their crystal balls. will assad fall, will israel bomb iran, and will the euro zone finally break apart? >>> then the fiscal cliff. the view from across the pond. how did our political process look from a perch overseas and what will it all mean for the u.s. economy and the global economy? >>> also, will this be india's awakening? the nation confronts its own dark corners after a despicable deadly act. i'll look at some parallels with america's recent tragic school shooting. >>> first, here's my take. the deal to avoid the fiscal cliff is a small victory for sanity, but what it says about the future is somewhat bleak. washington will probably lurch from crisis to crisis kicking problems forward and placing band aids
, but i was interested in, i think, the real question is what kind of a iraq did the united states leave behind after sacrifice of 145 american lives lost, temperatures of thousands wounded, and hundreds of millions of dollars spent. what was the american policy towards iraq, and what's iraq look like today? that was the question i sought to address, but i covered the entire scope of the war. >> a year op, or, i guess, in december 2011, what had we achieved, and a year on, have we achieved that? >> well, by the time of -- by december 2011, there was a number of elections in iraq which was to the good, but iraq had not fully become a democracy in the sense there was not a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led to another prime minister. that's a true test of a democracy is whether there's not merely an election, and russia has elections, i serve there, but whether there's an election, another candidate wins, and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq is in the at that milestone yet. what we had in december 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but, i thi
status and resettlement in the united states. while the motivation behind creating these special immigrant categories were well intentioned, the fact remains that in may 2011, two iraqi nationals who were given refugee status and resettled in the u.s. were arrested and accused by the fbi of plotting to send weapons and money to al qaeda in iraq. one of the men arrested had openly discussed his prior experience as an insurgent in iraq and the ied attacks he participated against u.s. troops. the fingerprints of the other iraqi refugee charged were traced by the fbi to a component of an unexploded ied that was recovered by u.s. forces in northern iraq. in the wake of these arrests, dhs secretary janet napolitano and others have publicly acknowledged that security checks have been expanded to the more than 58,000 iraqi refugees who had already been settled in the united states. according to press reports this past february, intelligence indicates that the threat posed by refugees with ties to al qaeda is much broader than was previously believed. fbi director robert mueller stated la
and the forthcoming debt ceiling, the united states faces a much deeper challenge. for more than a decade now, for many decades by some measures, america's growth rates have slowed. recoveries have been jobless. and median wages have declined. some combination of the information revolution and globalization has placed tough pressures on high-wage countries like the united states. these new forces of technology and globalization are accelerating and without a strategy to revive growth, long-term growth, all our problems get worse, including and especially our debt. washington's focus so far has been on raising taxes and cutting spending. it should really be on reforming and investing in the american economy. historically when the american government or the world bank or the imf advised countries that got into trouble, they usually stress that achieving fiscal stability, austerity was only a part of the solution. the key to reviving growth is structural reform to make the economy more competitive, as well as crucial investments in human and physical capital to ensure the next generation of grow
kind of iraq did the united states leave behind after all the sacrifice, the american lives lost, the tens of thousands wounded, the billions of dollars expended. what was american policy toward iraq and what does iraq look like today said it is the question that i sought to address by in the up pretty much covered in the entire scope of the war since a lot of reporting on it. >> host: so a year on our december 2011 what have we achieved in a year on had we still achieved then? >> guest: well, why the time, by december of 2011, they're had been a number of elections in iraq, which is to the good, but iraq hadn't fully become a democracy in the sense that it hadn't been a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led by maliki to another pamela starr. i think that is a true test of democracy is whether there isn't an election and russia has elections as i served there there's another candidate wins and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq hasn't set that milestone yet. so, what we had in december of 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but i think un
to keep in mind where we have been and where we are going. we have 20 women in the united states senate. we have 80 men. there are only 16 democratic women in the senate, and four republican. we have a long, long ways to go. the united states of america was 77th in the world in the percentage of elected women to office. we cannot as an organization take on the whole problem. we believe that we need more women. our piece of the puzzle is to elect pro-choice democratic women. the democratic party is for the most part pro-choice. the vast majority of the women we work with are pro choice anyway. as the organization, when we started women were not running. part of what we do is not so much to choose them and make it happen, but we encourage women to step up and take this on. we need a lot more of that. we do not have enough women running for office in this country. host: why not the republican party? guest: it is not something that women think of doing right away. there is a study done by rutgers a couple of years ago that asks the question of all of these legislatures, women and men. how m
the way back to a deal that john lewis and harry truman made in 1946. the united mine workers and i insisted on a new law that we called the coal act protecting 200,000 miners and their families today. we actually helped avert a nationwide coal strike in 1994. in that fight, and so many others, we have been proud to stand with the working men and women of america. steelworkers, teachers, nurses, and everyone deserves a fair wage and a safe place to work with a basic health care. [applause] our country cannot be as great as it should be unless our workers voices are heard and respected. not only by everybody in general, but certainly policymakers. i am just a single-minded about comprehensive health-care reform. i know is not particularly popular in west virginia, but it's ok. because of my fingerprints are all over it, i know is good and i know it will benefit west virginia more than any other state. it is so incredibly complex, not just the 17% of gdp has people like to say, but it is so complex and involved and interests of people, nuances that we just had to do something about it
tough days over the next several days. >> i want to assure the people of haiti that the united states is a friend, a partner, and a supporter. >> in the next few days, people are going to be running out of food, out of water, i mean, we need help, urgent. >> i want the people of haiti to know that we will do what it takes to save lives and to help they will get back on their feet. >> the people of haiti will recover and rebuild, and as they do, they know they'll have a friend in the united states of america. >> this is the beginning of the flowering of haiti's north across every single economic segment. ♪ >> can i tell you, there's nothing better than, when the academy bus pulled up and the kids started parading off the bus some were tentative and they've never seen anything as magnificent as this. >> it's life changing for the kids to come to a school like this, that has computers, that has this good quality teachers. and get a good education. >> oh! >> nice to meet you. >> again, nice to meet you. >> nice to meet you. >> these are our neighbors, these are great kids and we want t
use or if they are dangerous and unusual weapons. that was a dichotomy set up by the united states supreme court. if they are in common use like handguns we have to go to the second step of the analysis. if they are dangerous and unusual weapons like machine gun, the analysis would stop there. assault weapons are pretty commonplace. they become popular and firearms in a gun rights community. there are apparently tens of millions of these firearms out there, arguably they are commonly used, but one argument is while they are common they are not commonly used for the core purpose of the second amendment, self-defense. they are poor self-defense weapons. it is hard to maneuver in the home, and projectiles are propelled of such a rate they are likely to pose dangers and who people as they go through walls, endangering family members or neighbors. if that is right, assault weapons would not be thought to be within the scope of the second amendment, and yet i should admit we talked extensively that there are some reasonable arguments you could make against an assault weapons ban. an assa
specific importance to the united states we understand, as was for us the issue of sovereignty and the tensions and the continued presence of international forces in afghan villages and the conduct of the war itself. with those issues resolved, as we did today, the rest was done earlier, i can go to the afghan people and argue for immunity for u.s. troops in afghanistan in a way that afghan sovereignty will not be compromised, in a way that afghan law will not be compromised, in a way that the provisions that we arrive at through our talks will give the united states the satisfaction of what it seeks, and will also provide the afghan people the benefit that they are seeking through this partnership and the subsequent agreement. [indiscernible] that is not for us to decide. it is an issue for the united states. numbers are not going to make a difference to the situation in afghanistan. it is the broader relationship that will make a difference to afghanistan and beyond in the region. the specifics of numbers are issues that the military will decide and afghanistan will have no p
created in your image, a unit of god's grace, unprecedented, a repeatable and irreplaceable. we play -- pray for your blessing. with out it we will see only what the eye can see. we will see that we're created in your image, whether brown, black, or white, male or female, first-generation immigrant american or daughter of the american revolution, gay or straight, rich or poor. we pray for your blessing. without it we will only see scarcity in the midst of abundance. with your blessing we will recognize the abundance of the gifts of this good land with which you have and out of this nation. we pray for your blessing. bless all of us. privilege to be a resident of this nation with a. of gratitude in humility that we may be a blessing. we pray that you will shower with your life giving spirit, that will be leaders of this land, especially barack our president and joe our vice-president. fill them with righteousness that they may serve this nation ably and be glad to do your will. endow their hearts with wisdom and forbearance so that peace may prevail with righteousness, and justice wit
in the united states and see what their efforts are. i want to begin with jeanne robinson, chief financial officer of first book. if you could describe what it is to start. >> yes, i just want to say thank you to c-span for all the support you've given tdi or industry and reading, literacy. c-span has been a leader on that and it's wonderful just to salute you. first book is a nonprofit and provides books and educational material to programs, serving cantonese, classroom serving kids in need across the united states. >> how to shoot it started and where the future funding from? >> we started 20 years ago. in fact, were celebrating her 100 millionth book distributed this week, probably when this airs, it will have been last week. we started 20 years ago at martha's table in washington d.c. we have distributed more and more as the years have gone by because we started a new remodel. in recent years redistributed 10 million, 11 million a year. we support programs across the united states is now over 40,000. our funding comes from corporate cause marketing campaigns we do as well as individual
days. >> i want to awe sure the people of hatiti that the united state is a friend, a partner and a supporter. >> in the next few days people are going to be running out of food, out of water. we need help because it's urgent. >> i want the people of haiti to know that we will do what it takes to save lives and to help them get back on their feet. >> the people of haiti will recover and rebuild and has the do they know they have a friend in the united states of america. >> this is the beginning of the flowering of haiti's north across every single economic sector. >> the academy bus pulled up for the fooirms the kids paraded and walked up to us they have never seen anything as magnificent as this. >> it is life changing for these children to have an opportunity to come to a school like this that has computers, that has good quality teachers and get a good education. >> nice to meet you. again nice to meet you. >> these are our neighbors. these are great kids. we want them to be the best they can be. ♪ >> young haitians got a chance at a new and better life. a 2010 earthquake
active on this issue, but the united states supreme court several times ago actually issued a ruling that really limited the due process rights in civil commitments, and really look at it, contemplated it as an extension of the existing criminal sentence. and so, but it hasn't stopped the litigation but there is a lot of work that needs to be done still on civil commitment issues. and so it's kind of an ongoing project, and is in a host of different context, another talk by specific context, but this people, people civilly committed for mental because of mental illness. and there are a range of issues that the aclu has been working on with partner groups to actually address and raise the due process concerns about civil commitment. >> can you explain something about the philosophy behind incarceration, and why, what is the idea behind isolating a person so acutely? >> so, aside from the campaign to end overincarceration, the aclu likes of the campaigns, but another one is a campaign to stop the use of solitary or at least significantly curb its use. we've been very active the last se
years ago, as we all know, we were considering lmj terminals to import natural gas to the united states. what a difference a few short years make. by developing new technology to access potential new sources like oil shale, which often goes not talked about, we will be able to dramatically increase our energy potential and role as the global energy leader. oil shale in the western united today is estimated at 800 billion barrels, which is nearly three times the proven oil reserve of saudi arabia. as the numbers clearly show, we in the industry are investing in america's future. and we'll be sharing what that means through a new campaign we are launching over the next few weeks, which will focus on raising understanding of the unique and foundational role of the u.s. oil and natural gas industry and what it means to our economy. what it means for our communities, and for o- america's lives, for revenue, for refining, and what it means ultimately to job creation and economic recovery. oil and natural gas companies support 9.2 million jobs and could easily support an additional 1.4 million
you around the world in 60 minutes. we begin with nuclear threats against the united states. north korea announced plans to test more nuclekes and more lon range rocket launches. north korea's defense commission calls america the sworn enemy of the korean people. i want to get straight to new york. >> the words are very threatening. it is very incredible to hear them directly threaten united states in that way just ahead of what they say will be another nuclear test. what i'm hearing and what analysts are saying is that is probably how one would have expected them to react. it comes just a day after yet more u.s. action and u.n. action at the security council and more sanction action. most people believe this is not a threat of attacking the united states but certainly the words are threatening to the united states. they say analysts that this is north korea's way of trying to deter any further action from the international community. and that they have no capacity to invade in terms of long range missiles to reach the u.s. it is a serious issue if they do test any kind of nuclear
, wicked, jekyll & hyde all getting together at the end of this month raise money for the united way. >> bill: good for them. good for them. thank you dan. yes, indeed, an historic day at the white house. i got out of my sickbed to go down for the announcement in the east room. president obama coming out at 1:10 and announcing the final two members of the national security team. last week he nominated john kerry, a great choice to be secretary of state. yesterday, he presented to the world his next two picks. >> obama: to help meet the challenges of our time, i'm proud to announce my choice for two key members of my national security team. chuck hagel for secretary of defense and john brennan for directorror of the central intelligence agency. >> bill: the president was adamant in his praise of hagel who the president befriended when he was a member of the senate traveled with him to iraq and afghanistan, got to know him as independent centrist moderate, republican. and was willing to stand up to the leaders of his own party and say they were wrong. originally voted for the war in ir
. who gets privilege of becoming a citizen of the united states of america. that's a big deal. when we talk about that in the abstract, it's easy sometimes for the discussion to take on a feeling of us versus them. and when that happens, a lot of folks forget that most of us used to be them. [chuckles] >> we forget that [applause] it's really important foritous remember our history. unless you are one of the first americans, a native american, you came from someplace else. somebody brought you. [cheers and applause] you know, ken salazar, he's of mexican-american dissent, but his family's been living where he lives for 400 years. so he didn't immigrate anywhere. the irish, who left behind a land of famine, the germans who fled persecution, the scandinavians who arrived eager to pioneer out west, the polish, the russians, the italgian, the chinese, the japanese, the west indians, the huddled masses who came from ellis island on one coast and angel island on the other... [applause] all those folks, before they were us, they were them. and when each new wave of immigrants, they faced from
and the government is getting violent. the united states is getting involved. they're threatening to take control of the entire country. the militants' move prompted france to take action over the weekend. they put boots on the ground and went all in, bombing rebel training camps and other targets. so what will the united states do? a pentagon official told me this afternoon that the u.s. will participate in mali, but, and i want to make sure i put quotes around this, it's still deciding what that looks like. when we went to the mali border last summer, i saw first hand how dangerous the situation is. today, we spoke to some of our sources on the ground, including the military commander of the al qaeda's linked group. he told us that the militants are, in his words, excited and would welcome u.s. troops on the ground. he also said the french bombs have killed civilians and that france is signing a death warrant for french people around the world, opening the gates of hell. omar said the militants will fight to the end and this will be a long war, more dangerous than afghanistan or iraq. we also s
washington. your gracious favor and devine blessings upon these united states of america, our president, barack obama, and vice president joseph biden as a second term of their sacred responsibilities in the highest office of our country. bless, preserve, and keep them and their families safe and healthy together with all who serve our nation's, especially in the congress, the judiciary, and the armed forces, here and everywhere who heroically and sack -- sacrifice for the life of liberty and the pursuit of happiness. father, may we ever abide in this land of opportunity and freedom in perfect tranquility, faithful to our foundations and ever more prosperous, just e quitble society for all our citizens, and may we always share our faith and hope for the future with the whole world through your define and gracious love. amen. >> thank you. >> okay, please be seated for a moment. my pleasure, arch bishop. thank you. well, i think everyone would agree there's been a wonderful inaugust grail ceremony, a delicious lunch, and it's now time to head to the next happy stop, the presidential para
to risk the full faith and credit of the united states for whatever agenda you have. the business community felt that. the public felt that. and so the fact that they have backed off both -- not only the idea that we should hold debt ceiling hostage, but second that it shouldn't be one for one cuts, you know, boehner used to say that, the house proposal doesn't say that, dollar in cutting for every dollar in raising the debt ceiling. >> would you support a short-term measure to force you to pass a budget? >> i think it should be longer because we don't want to play fiscal cliff every three months. but it's a positive step. >> you never get a clean debt ceiling raise. >> yes, you should. >> that's not a question of whether you should. but historically it's not been the case. >> mitch mcconnell proposed it two years ago and we passed it. but let me say this on the budget. we democrats have always intended to do a budget this year. for two reasons. first, it is not true that we haven't had budget control in effect over the last several years. the budget control act of 2011 put rigid
>> barack obama is projected to be the next president of the united states. >> tonight ofrontline... >> they thought success would breed success. >> we'll move for a quick kill-- that's how they referred to it, "a quick kill on capitol hill." >> their leadership told the members, "no, just say no." >> there was a polarizing quality about barack obama that came roaring forward. >> he was in a position to make demands, and he didn't. >> he's the first nobel peace prize winner with a kill list. >> i think he understands that the glory days are over and everything's going to be more challenging. >> now he gets another chance to be the guy who united the country. >> in the week before his inauguration, a look back "inside obama's presidency." >> frontlinis made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontline is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.
and credit of the united states. with bruises fresh from the last dust up early jabs are already flying. joining is democratic chris van hollen and republican jim jordan. senate minority leader said the revenue piece is done. the president wants more tax he needs to limit deductions and limit the loop holes. >> mitch mcconell will draw the line in the sand . we have to take a balanced approach meaning additional cuts and remember, year the president signed in law more than 1.5 trillion in cuts. 100 percent cuts. as a result of avoiding the fiscal cliff we raised 730 billion from high income individuals. as we go forward we need to adopt the same frame work as the simpsons-bowles commission . remember in the campaign you saw the republican candidate and paul ryan talking about the breaks in the loop holes, guess what, they are still there. through tax reform we can raise more revenue to address the sequester issue and long-term deficit. >> john: congressman jordan do you buy that? >> no, they are scheduled for the outyears. congress said give us the revenue and we'll promise to get the c
the military will let women serve in front line combat units, including infantry, artillery, even potentially special forces. >> our nation was built on the premise of the citizen soldier. and our democracy, i believe it is the responsibility of every citizen to protect the nation. >> the policy came together after more than a year's effort by secretary panetta and joint chiefs chairman martin dempsey with the heads of each service signing off. the branches will have until may to submit plans for integrating women and they'll also be able to make the case that certain specialties should not be open to women, special forces, for instance. early reaction was mixed. one said men and women side by side in combat would be distracting, harmful, and awkward for unit cohesion. >> combat is a very hard game. i think people are being awfully cavalier about this restriction being lifted. combat is a life or death game. if we get this wrong, the loser dies. >> republican senator james inhofe sounded alarm bells saying congress may have to put the brakes on the deal, and family research groups weighed in.
the united states of america! [cheers and applause] >> goodach, everyone. we just watched as president obama pushed his plan for immigration reform in las vegas. coming just one day after the senate beat him to the punch, announcing its bipartisan proposal. president obama making remarks in las vegas. the president called for granting a path to citizenship for the estimated 11 million people in the united states, currently illegally. he praised the senate's efforts in announcing an immigration proposal yesterday. that plan had a key provision, requiring tighter border security before any illegal immigrants could get citizenship. that was key to republican support. it also calls for beefing up border security and punishments for businesses that hire illegal immigrants. republicans say they will not sign off on any immigration reform that doesn't put border security first. let's go to carl cameron in washington. how do you break this down? is there a big difference from what you heard from president obama, compared to the bipartisan commission of eight senators yesterday? we heard a lot more f
. [applause] >> if you get sick and choose to go to the united states, you have a higher risk of medical error. the cures for aids and alzheimer's will come from america, not canada. >> imagine a world without religious faith. not just no place to worship, no prayer, no scripture, but no men or women who, because of their faith, dedicate their lives to others. >> over us to supervise this. a celestial dictatorship. a kind of divine north korea. [laughter] >> i can't believe i'm about to say this, but dr. kissinger, you have six minutes. >> i think that is the kind of hypocritical argument i would find quite annoying. [laughter] >> you obviously finding it annoying even if you are not chinese. [laughter] >> well, ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the munk debates on iran. [cheers and applause] this is munk's debates on iran's nuclear ambitions. it is my privilege to organize this series and once again at as your moderate. we begin with a look back, a look back of some of the memorable moments of previous debates. tonight is a special evening for this series. tonight is our 10th semiannual munk d
that opened up hope for six and a half million people. the problem is the united states has never been very good, whether it's in afghanistan, iraq, in creating an alternative and the bol line is the united states basically walked away when it came to how do you create a new state, how do you facilitate the diverse forces, whether it's the tribal elements, more than 300 militias that had formed during that brief eight-month involvement, how do you stem the flow of weaponry and create an alternative. if you saw charlie wilson's war, at the very ending of the movie when he says i raised all this money, billions of dollars for arms to the opposition to fight off the soviets but i couldn't raise a couple of million dollars for education. it's the same kind of problem. we're not good at figuring out what alternatives are and as a result libya destabilized and a lot of the arms that went into libya, a lot of the forces that were militarized flowed not just into mali and algeria but across a huge chunk of northwest africa. as a result you see a huge destabilization that's affect in turn little tun
, france, and the united states, and britain. >> many of the people i've worked in the area many years. i asked for your understanding for not being able to give you more detailed information. >> it's not clear how many algerian workers are being held. least 30 people have managed to escape. a catering company said that it has 150 employees alone still confined at the plant. the gas field is in remote parts of the country's eastern desert, serviced by its own air fields, accommodations, and hospital. several hundred people are believed to work on the base at any one time. it's just 100 kilometers west of the libyan border. one armed group says it carried out the attack as payback for algeria allowing france to use its air bases in the assault against al qaeda dazzling spiders in neighboring mali. >> according to the information we have, there are about 20 terrorists inside. we believe they take orders from him and i don't believe they came from mali or libya. this is a revenge attack aimed at foreign countries participating in the attacks in mali. >> that is an excuse. usually, operations
that cannot be cured by what is right with america. >> the united states will not ignore your oppression or excuse your oppressors. >> all are equal. all are free, and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness. >>> the presidential inauguration is getting under way right here on the capitol, and we have a front row seat. >> here on the national mall, people are staking out their spot to experience this moment in history. >> the sun rises on barack obama's second term. >> we gather because we have chosen hope over fear. unity over purpose. >> on this day, a public celebration of the presidency after a private oath the day before. >> so help you god? >> so help me god. >> on this capitol where so many battles have been fought and will be fought, political rivalries are being set aside in a show of democracy and unity for all the world to see. >> and we remain more than a collection of red states and blue states. we are and forever will be the united states of america. >>> we're live here on the west front of the united states capitol for one of the grandest celebration
to the president of the united states asking them to do. and the letter is in i think a copy of letter isn't maxing. also online. but what is so striking for me about that is if you stop for a moment and imagine that instant in time july 1903 where your brother has been kidnapped, and kidnapped a year ago and is in slavery, she's probably visited him. i think the letter signals that so she has seen in chains being worked with dozens of other men out on a farm, on a 20,000-acre plantation in south georgia owned by the most powerful white family in georgia at the time. she knows the desperate state he is in pictures of witness the deprivations being perpetrated against in -- against them. no one of power in her world cares come and to reach a moment of human desperation so great that the only thing you can think of to do still, the only thing left to try is write a letter to the president of the united states, at the magic that that might actually a college some good. the depth of desperation of that moment was so powerful to me when i first found out later. and, of course, what happened, nothing. no
with impunity. for the united states it hasn't been an area of vital interest ever. it's much closer to europe. it's much more of concern to europe than it has ever been for the united states. that's why we kind of led from behind. >> in libya. >> in libya itself. because europeans were the ones exercised about it. we didn't care that much in terms of vital national interests compare today say the gulf. but just as after the soviet union was thrown out of afghanistan, we considered afghanistan not of any real interest to us and of course that's where al qaeda took root. so here again we've got that problem. and we cannot afford to let this just burgeon forth because you can see in the attack in algeria that american lives are at stake here. >> this was the point secretary clinton made as part of her testimony. she says anywhere the united states is not have a significant involvement, particularly in such areas of instability and a threat from a jihadist movement and affiliate say of al qaeda, there could be real problems. we see it in algeria and yet what did we hear from the president this we
karzai. we're there for the benefit of the united states. as long as there is a threat that comes from afghanistan, al qaeda, as long as afghanistan could be in the future used as a potential safe haven against people in the united states, we're there, we have to recognize that we're there.safee united states, we're there, we have to recognize that we're there. and we have to remember first principles. we're there for the defense of the american mainland and american people. >> always good to get your thoughts. appreciate it, sir. >> take care. >>> in december russias passed a law banning u.s. adoptions. that left hundreds in limbo wondering what were happening to the children they were already in the process of adopting. now there may be some hope for those people. >>> one problem after another this week if boeing 787 dream liner. now the u.s. government weighing in. >>> also coming up, it is the first and only exhibition of its kind to ever tour the united states featuring 150 mummies. fr r. clear, huh? i'm not juice or fancy water. i've got nine grams of protein. that's three times
to the next president of the united states. this was a different man. >> there are tens of thousands, maybe hundreds of thousands who have gathered in grant park in chicago. >> ladies and gentlemen, the next first family of the united states of america. >> narrator: only four years earlier, he'd been a state legislator. >> the look on his face to me looked like someone who finally understood the weight of the job that he had just won. >> almost as if the weight of the world had rested on his shoulders. >> the road ahead will be long, our climb will be steep. two wars, a planet in peril, the worst financial crisis in a century. but america, i have never been more hopeful than i am tonight that we will get there. i promise you, we as a people will get there. god bless you, and may god bless the united states of america. >> narrator: if he had any idea that night how difficult this would be, the next day would prove it. >> so much for that election day euphoria... >> the economy has now lost 650,000 jobs just in the past three months... >> all eyes are now on barack obama to turn it around...
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